Volume IV-2/W6
ISPRS Ann. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., IV-2/W6, 17–24, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-annals-IV-2-W6-17-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
ISPRS Ann. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., IV-2/W6, 17–24, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-annals-IV-2-W6-17-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  21 Aug 2019

21 Aug 2019

CLASSIFICATION OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES FOR HERITAGE MANAGEMENT INVENTORY: THE CASE OF THE ANCIENT SYNAGOGUES IN THE GALILEE

Y. Alef Y. Alef
  • Bar-Ilan University, Department of geography and Environment, Ramat Gan, 5290002 Israel; Israel Antiquities Authority, Conservation Department, Nahalal 10600, P.O.B. 35, Israel

Keywords: Archaeological Resource Management (ARM), Heritage inventory, GIS, Conservation, Ancient synagogues, Israel

Abstract. A conservation survey of 66 ancient synagogues in the Galilee, served as a pilot for the development of an inventory for heritage management in the Israel Antiquities Authority. The pilot raised some issues concerning the information categories and their informed use for decisions making about the conservation policy for the sites. These issues formed the basis for ongoing research that examined the significance of the information categories and their interrelationship, from the heritage management perspective. The paper presents some of the results and focuses on the classification of the sites to management types. The classification is based on their excavation status with regards to management status and management activities. From this criterion six types emerged: A) Remains known from surveys (Non-excavated); B) Ongoing excavation, and excavated, which are subdivided into four additional groups: C) Remains cleared for modern development (after salvage excavation), D) Non-Stewarded; E) Partially Stewarded; and F) Stewarded. This classification enables to identify common characteristics and sensitivities for which management policy can be formulated, thus providing a solution to the complexity, and dynamism of the sites variables, conditions, and values. While in other fields and organizational frameworks, the types may vary, the criteria for classification, could be applied in broader contexts as well. The study concludes with the need for applied research on the practical use of inventories for informed heritage management.