ISPRS Annals of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences
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Articles | Volume IV-3
ISPRS Ann. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., IV-3, 45–52, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-annals-IV-3-45-2018
ISPRS Ann. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., IV-3, 45–52, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-annals-IV-3-45-2018

  23 Apr 2018

23 Apr 2018

GLOBALLY INCREASED CROP GROWTH AND CROPPING INTENSITY FROM THE LONG-TERM SATELLITE-BASED OBSERVATIONS

Bin Chen1,2 Bin Chen
  • 1Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Earth System Modelling, Department of Earth System Science, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084, China
  • 2Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA

Keywords: Crop growth trend, Multiple cropping system, Spatiotemporal pattern, Remote sensing, Climate change

Abstract. Understanding the spatiotemporal change trend of global crop growth and multiple cropping system under climate change scenarios is a critical requirement for supporting the food security issue that maintains the function of human society. Many studies have predicted the effects of climate changes on crop production using a combination of filed studies and models, but there has been limited evidence relating decadal-scale climate change to global crop growth and the spatiotemporal distribution of multiple cropping system. Using long-term satellite-derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and observed climate data from 1982 to 2012, we investigated the crop growth trend, spatiotemporal pattern trend of agricultural cropping intensity, and their potential correlations with respect to the climate change drivers at a global scale. Results show that 82.97 % of global cropland maximum NDVI witnesses an increased trend while 17.03 % of that shows a decreased trend over the past three decades. The spatial distribution of multiple cropping system is observed to expand from lower latitude to higher latitude, and the increased cropping intensity is also witnessed globally. In terms of regional major crop zones, results show that all nine selected zones have an obvious upward trend of crop maximum NDVI (p < 0.001), and as for climatic drivers, the gradual temperature and precipitation changes have had a measurable impact on the crop growth trend.