Volume IV-5
ISPRS Ann. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., IV-5, 87-94, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-annals-IV-5-87-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
ISPRS Ann. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., IV-5, 87-94, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-annals-IV-5-87-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  15 Nov 2018

15 Nov 2018

APPLICATION OF GIS FOR THE DESIGN OF POTABLE WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM IN IIRS

V. Shrivastava1, A. Jaiswal2, P. K. Thakur1, S. P. Agarwal1, P. Kumar2, G. K. Kota2, D. Carrera2, M. K. Dhasmana1, V. Sharma1, and S. Singh1 V. Shrivastava et al.
  • 1Water Resources Department, Indian Institute of Remote Sensing, Dehradun, India
  • 2Indian Institute of Remote Sensing, Dehradun, India

Keywords: Potable water distribution, EPANET 2.0, Dehradun, Network analysis, pipeline

Abstract. The design and analysis of potable water distribution pipe network is one of the major task while planning any new city. Even finding the effectiveness and detecting any anomaly in the existing pipe line network is a very important to cut down losses and make a network all time efficient. This study makes an attempt to evaluate the existing water distribution network of Indian Institute of Remote Sensing (IIRS) and new pipe network to be developed under the master plan 2022. The new development induces an extra demand of 67634 litres per day (lpd). The Digital Globe image from Google Earth Pro is used for creating base layer and campus layout. ALOS PALSAR digital elevation model (DEM) is used to get elevation of nodes and tanks, which helps in alignment of pipes. Field survey was done for finding all the data necessary to make the database for input for EPANET 2.0. EPANET 2.0 pipe hydraulic model was used to test and design the existing and proposed potable water distribution pipe network. The results of evaluation of current operations show that the system can be made capable to fulfil the demand by increasing pumping time. But the future network operation requires an increase in pumping capability of 71 litre per minute (lpm) for filling Overhead tank. This study proves that geospatial technology is an efficient, time and cost saving alternative to the traditional methods of design and evaluation of potable water distribution networks.