ISPRS Annals of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences
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Articles | Volume V-3-2020
ISPRS Ann. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., V-3-2020, 757–764, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-annals-V-3-2020-757-2020
ISPRS Ann. Photogramm. Remote Sens. Spatial Inf. Sci., V-3-2020, 757–764, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/isprs-annals-V-3-2020-757-2020

  03 Aug 2020

03 Aug 2020

SATELLITE-DRIVEN ASSESSMENT OF SURFACE URBAN HEAT ISLANDS IN THE CITY OF ZAGREB, CROATIA

A. Krtalić1, A. Kuveždić Divjak1, and K. Čmrlec2 A. Krtalić et al.
  • 1Faculty of Geodesy, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia
  • 2Geodata Projekt, Zagreb, Croatia

Keywords: Surface Urban Heat Island, Land Surface Temperature, Environmental Criticality Index, Vegetation Indices, Remote Sensing

Abstract. This study aims to assess surface urban heat islands (SUHIs) pattern over the city of Zagreb, Croatia, based on satellite (optical and thermal) remote sensing data. The spatio-temporal identification of SUHIs is analysed using the 12 sets of Landsat 8 imagery acquired during 2017 (in each month of the year). Vegetation cover within the city boundaries is extracted by using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) data fusion method on calculated three vegetation indices (VI): Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) and Ratio Vegetation Index (RVI) for each set of bands. The first principal component was used to compute the land surface temperature (LST) and deductive Environmental Criticality Index (ECI). As expected, the relationship between LST and all VI scores shows a negative correlation and is most negative with RVI. The environmentally critical areas and the patterns of seasonal variations of the SUHIs in the city of Zagreb were identified based on the LST, ECI and vegetation cover. The city centre, an industrial area in the eastern part and an area with shopping centers and commercial buildings in the western part of the city were identified as the most critical areas.